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Ready for soup season? The beginning to any good soup is, of course, broth! Bone broth is a wonderful way of getting minerals and nutrients to your body. Bone broth has minerals, amino acids, and gelatin. These all promote healthy connective tissue and strong bones and teeth. Bone broth also is soothing to your gut and is a non-fibrous way of getting nourishment if your gut feels irritated.

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What is bone broth?

Bone broth is the result of boiling bones (and a few other things) with water to make a delicious liquid! The only difference between bone broth and stock is that bone broth is cooked longer than stock, has a different amino acid profile, and is more watery.

The cool thing about bone broth is that it is made from, well, basically kitchen waste. Here are the main components:

  • Bones of any kind, chewed steak bones, chicken carcasses, chicken necks, soup bones, chicken feet (they add a lot of gelatin, which is great for your gut!)
  • Vegetable scraps such as onion skins, zucchini tops, cores of hot peppers, carrot tops, etc.
  • Water
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Salt

There are endless add-ins you can throw in the pot to add more minerals and medicinal properties. Here are just a few to get your imagination going:

  • Ginger root
  • Garlic
  • Turmeric fresh or powdered
  • Peppercorns
  • Herbs such a rosemary, thyme, or sage
  • Celery
  • Soy sauce or Coconut Aminos

Broth-Making Methods

  • Crockpot– I use the crock pot because it’s simple and I feel safer about leaving it going when I’m gone or in bed.
  • Stock pot– This is the best method to use if you have a lot of bones and want to make several gallons at a time.
  • Instant pot– This is the quickest method, taking only 3-4 hours.

How to Make Broth

Alright, it’s time to get down to the nitty-gritty. But trust me, this isn’t hard and you definitely can do it!

 

Put the bones in your pot. Experiment with how many bones you need to make a good tasty broth. I’ve found that one chicken carcass per crockpot full of water is a good ratio. If you are doing a big stock pot, you might want two or three chicken carcasses. This time, I’m using chicken necks.

 

 

Add veggie scraps. I am using onion skins and ginger root.

 

 

Cover with water.

 

 

Add a dash of apple cider vinegar. This helps pull extra minerals from the bones.

 

 

I added turmeric powder and kelp granules for extra minerals.

 

 

Put the lid on and cook:

  • In the crockpot, put on low and leave for 12-24 hours
  • In the stockpot, bring to a boil, then reduce to low for 12-24 hours
  • In the instant pot, cook under high pressure for 2-3 hours, let pressure release naturally at the end.

 

 

Once it’s done, let it cool, pour the broth through a strainer into a large bowl. Taste for saltiness and add salt as needed. It’s always better if your helper is grumpy and tired, too. Just trying to share tricks of the trade, y’all.

 

 

Pour into jars or any container you have. I use half gallon mason jars. Refrigerate for up to a week. Mine is being kept company in my fridge with 20 pounds of pig fat to render into lard and gargantuan onions!

If you freeze it, make sure you have only filled your jars 1/2-3/4 full, otherwise it will expand and you will have a bunch of cracked mason jars. Don’t ask me how I know…

 

How to use bone broth

  • Chicken noodle soup
  • Drink the broth straight from a mug 
  • Chili
  • Make sprouted rice
  • Add it to mashed potatoes instead of milk

 

Hope you enjoyed this! Share your ideas of how to use broth, as well as any other add-ins you put in your broth that makes is super yummy or nutritious! I’d love to hear what other people do.

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